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Christina Applegate Actress

Christina Applegate

Christina earned Hollywood popularity in the role as the dumb blonde "Kelly Bundy" on the hit comedy series "Married With Children. Christina's comic attributes and sexy appearance launched her a successful acting career. A natural blonde Hollywood baby, Applegate was raised by her actress mother, Nancy Priddy, after Priddy split from Applegate's father, record executive Bobby Applegate. Making her acting debut as an infant with her mother on TV's Days of Our Lives, Applegate subsequently landed her first movie role at age ten when she appeared with Priddy in the low-grade horror flick Jaws of Satan (1981). After playing Grace as a child in the TV biopic Grace Kelly (1983), Applegate guest starred on several TV shows before landing her own permanent series role in the short-lived Heart of the City (1986). Her next series, however, proved the charm. Debuting in 1987 on the fledgling Fox TV network, Married...With Children withstood criticisms about its all-around vulgarity to become one of Fox's first signature hits.

During its ten-year run, Married...With Children also spawned the TV movie It's a Bundyful Life (1992), featuring Applegate and the rest of the Bundy clan in a spoof of holiday chestnut It's a Wonderful Life (1946). A bona fide teen heartthrob/star, Applegate attempted to show her serious side as a prostitute and drug addict in the gritty drama Streets (1990). Teen comedy Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead (1991) tried to capitalize on Applegate's TV fame while showcasing her as a smart, resourceful, anti-Bundy character. Also during Married...With Children's run, Applegate appeared in the female road movie Across the Moon (1994), mutilated rock musician-drama Vibrations (1995), and as the town whore in Walter Hill's underrated Western Wild Bill (1995). Applegate's Married fame further landed her a small part in the all-star ensemble populating Tim Burton's science fiction parody Mars Attacks! (1996), and wryly shaded her presence in Gregg Araki's Los Angeles teen anomie opus Nowhere (1997), the slickest entrant in his "teen apocalypse trilogy."

Ready to leave the TV-bred teen realm behind after Married went off the air in 1997, Applegate co-starred with Mark Wahlberg in the Hong Kong-tinged action-comedy The Big Hit (1998) and played the WASP fiancée of a Mob scion in Jim Abrahams' Mafia movie parody Mafia! (1998). She co-starred with her eventual husband, Johnathon Schaech, and erstwhile teen idol Molly Ringwald in the high school reunion thriller The Giving Tree (1999) as well. Inspired by her experience with her mother growing up, though, Applegate agreed to return to TV to star as a single mom balancing work and family in the sitcom Jesse (1998). Despite choice time slots, however, Jesse was canceled in 2000. Applegate returned to movie comedy co-starring with Jean Reno as a princess and modern gal in the ill-received remake of a French time-travel yarn Just Visiting (2001). Subsequently holding her own opposite some of her more lustrous film peers, Applegate earned far better reviews than the movie itself as Cameron Diaz's levelheaded best friend in the raunchy female bonding romp The Sweetest Thing (2002), and flew the friendly skies with Gwyneth Paltrow in the flight attendant comedy A View From the Top (2003).

In 2004, Applegate landed herself leading-lady roles in two of the year's most anticipated films. First, in July, she starred opposite Will Ferrell in the 70s-era comedy Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. Then, the following November, she could be seen with Ben Affleck in the holiday film Surviving Christmas. Christina was born on November 25, 1971, in Hollywood, California. Her parents split up shortly after her birth. She has two step-siblings from her father's re-marriage - Alisa (b. 1977) & Kyle (b. 1981). Alisa and Christina are best friends and even lived together while Alisa was going to college. Christina's mother took her along on all of her auditions and acting jobs. She made her acting debut at age five months, when her mother got her in a commercial for Playtex nursers. Her mother never remarried, but kept company with Stephen Stills. Christina still cherishes a guitar Stephen gave her when she was young. Christina still studies jazz dance. She supports People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). She enjoys reading books about spirituality. Christina Applegate married longtime boyfriend Johnathon Schaech on October 20, 2001, in a small Palm Springs ceremony, attended by immediate family and friends.


Christina Applegate Breaks Foot in 'Sweet Charity'

Christina Applegate, star of the Broadway-bound revival of "Sweet Charity," broke her foot during a performance in Chicago and will be out of the musical through its Boston tryout engagement, which begins Friday.

Applegate is expected to return to the musical by the time it starts preview performances April 4 in New York, John Barlow, a spokesman for the show, said Sunday. The musical is scheduled to open April 21 at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre.

"The entire `Charity' family wishes Christina a speedy recovery and looks forward to welcoming her back to the company when the show begins performances on Broadway," producer Barry Weissler said in a statement.
Applegate was injured during the opening moments of Friday's performance at Chicago's Cadillac Palace Theatre, but she continued to play for about 20 minutes before the show was stopped. After a short delay, Applegate's understudy, Dylis Croman, took over the role, and the performance resumed.

Applegate will be replaced for the Boston engagement of the show, March 18-March 27, by her standby, Charlotte d'Amboise, who currently is playing Roxie Hart in the Broadway company of "Chicago."

Applegate, best known for her role as the teenage tart on television's "Married … With Children," will be making her Broadway debut in the musical.

"Sweet Charity" tells the story of Charity Hope Valentine, a goodhearted taxi dancer who always falls in love with the wrong man. The musical, which has a book by Neil Simon and a score by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields, was first done on Broadway in 1966 with Gwen Verdon in the title role. Shirley MacLaine starred in the 1969 film version. Dancer-choreographers Debbie Allen and then Ann Reinking were in the 20th-anniversary Broadway revival in 1986.

What Christina Applegate is doing now

'Married ... with Children' actress about to hit Broadway. The actress, best-known for playing the bimbette daughter on TV's "Married ... With Children," is starring in a revival of "Sweet Charity," opening April 21 on Broadway after an extended tryout tour.

"It had nothing to do with my career, my public or anything else," she says during an interview in the sleek, 42nd Street offices of Clear Channel Entertainment, one of the show's producers. She's talking about facing a New York theater audience for the first time.

"This needed to happen for me to become a better person, a better artist. After talking to a lot of people I respect, it hit me: 'If I don't do this, I will regret it for the rest of my life.' "

The actress says this calmly, deliberately, during an afternoon lunch break, sitting in an antiseptic, anonymous corporate lounge that looks westward to the Hudson River. At 33, Applegate appears 10 years younger. The skin is flawless. The blond hair a bit tousled. Wearing jeans, a stylish T-shirt and a maroon scarf wrapped around her neck, she ignores a package of sushi as well as the bottled water placed before her.

Applegate is talking about Charity Hope Valentine, the goodhearted taxi dancer at the center of the Cy Coleman/Dorothy Fields/Neil Simon musical. It's not an easy role for a neophyte theater performer. Charity is a killer part, one that has to carry the whole show. No Charity, no musical.

In the past, "Sweet Charity" has attracted an impressive parade of women in the title role, starting in 1966 with the legendary Gwen Verdon, directed by the equally legendary choreographer Bob Fosse. Juliet Prowse was Charity in London. Shirley MacLaine starred in the 1969 film version. And dancer-choreographers Debbie Allen and then Ann Reinking were in the 20th-anniversary Broadway revival in 1986.

Applegate's theater experience is barely a blip, but that didn't stop producer Barry Weissler, the man behind the revivals of "Chicago" and "Wonderful Town," from hiring her.

"She has all of the qualities we wanted for our Charity -- innocence, vulnerability and yet she's seductive," Weissler says. "She's a beautiful young woman, and we all fell in love with her."
Making the show 'fresh'

Applegate did have to face some grueling tests to get the job.

"She was the only woman who got through the dance audition," said Cilento, who has the unenviable task of coming up with new choreography for a show indelibly stamped with the footprints -- and dance steps -- of Fosse.

"Her line readings were so honest that they just made the material fresh," he said.

According to director Walter Bobbie, this 2005 "Sweet Charity" -- the first with a post-Fosse generation of dancers -- won't be a slavish revival.
"We had the blessing of Cy (who died last November) and Neil over the past year," Bobbie said, explaining that both composer and book writer were willing to re-examine the material. "To see these two men -- at this point in their careers -- take that on was an inspiration."

Not that Cilento, who worked with Fosse on "Dancin' " and "Big Deal," won't pay homage to the master. "We don't want to reinvent 'Sweet Charity' to destroy it. We want to create new life and to bring a new point of view to the show," he said.

Applegate's journey to "Sweet Charity" began with her audition for the movie version of "Chicago." A tape was made of her audition, and the actress feels that may have sparked interest in her for the stage role of Charity.

"I grew up with the film of 'Sweet Charity,' and I was obsessed with Fosse," Applegate recalls. She has been taking dance lessons since age 5, although she stopped dancing about 10 years ago. "I felt like I had missed the boat in not doing it professionally in New York, which is what I wanted to do as a kid. I wanted to do Broadway."

She had several meetings with Coleman, including one particularly intense, three-hour get-together in Los Angeles.

"He was really challenging me. He wanted to see if vocally I had the stamina to do this. It was a very hardcore work session, but it was wonderful," she says.

Yet after Applegate was offered the job, it took her several months to commit, because she has never lived outside of her Los Angeles neighborhood, where she makes her home with her husband, actor Johnathon Schaech, who recently played Judas in the TV movie "Judas Iscariot."

"This was about uprooting my life -- moving away from what was comfortable," she says.
A life in show business

Right now, Applegate is in Chicago, where "Sweet Charity," is undergoing revisions and changes on its way to New York.

The reviews in Minneapolis, where the musical opened earlier this month, suggested work needed to be done. The Star Tribune called the show "a splash but no smash," and said Applegate "stays pretty and perky for much of the musical, serving cuteness instead of character."

After the Chicago run ends March 13, "Sweet Charity" heads to Boston, March 18-26. Preview performances start April 4 on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre.

Applegate was a child of show business. Her father, Robert Applegate, is a record producer; her mother is actress-singer Nancy Priddy. Her first commercial was done before she was a year old. She remembers doing radio commercials at the age of 3. "That's when I started to really enjoy this," she says, talking about her show-biz upbringing.

"I didn't have anything else to compare it to. That's just what I did: after school, I went to auditions or I went to dance class or I went on the set and I didn't go to school for a while. I've worked steadily since I was 13 -- 20 years."

If "Married ... With Children" brought her the most fame, she also did "Jesse," a short-lived sitcom on NBC and had a guest shot on "Friends," which won her an Emmy in 2003.

"Those shows will be with me forever, and that's OK," Applegate says. "Ten years ago, I might have had a different answer. I'm a grown-up now, and I value the training I had.

"People always ask, 'Do you want to get rid of it?' As if being on a sitcom was a bad thing. They are not easy to do, and it was a wonderful challenge. It's a wonderful gift to be able to do that every week. And they pay really well, too."

Plus her television shows were filmed before live audiences, a big help in her efforts to understand the relationship between performer and audience in her current role. "You are aware of them. When you are doing comedy, you have to be. Everything is about your relationship with them. It's about pulling them in."

The first time Applegate and the "Sweet Charity" company went through the entire show without stopping, she found it was hard and exhausting -- "one dance number going into another dance number, and I'm in every single scene."

But at the end, I thought, 'OK, I can do this. I'm not afraid of this anymore.'

Christina Applegate: If they could see me now...

To win the starring role in 'Sweet Charity,' Christina Applegate had to convince others -- and herself -- that she could sing.

There would be no special treatment for Christina Applegate. If she wanted to star in the Broadway revival of ''Sweet Charity," the actress best known for her role as television teen vamp Kelly Bundy would have to prove she could sing and dance. She would have to audition.
Applegate wanted the part. She had always loved Bob Fosse, who choreographed the musical's 1966 debut and three years later directed Shirley MacLaine in the movie.

So she spent weeks preparing with a voice coach--she had never sung in public--and her dance teacher. For the tryout, she flew to New York with her mother, actress Nancy Priddy. Yet in her hotel room that morning, Applegate realized she was shaking as she worked on her hair.

It didn't get any easier when she arrived at the audition to perform for a lineup of Broadway royalty that included playwright Neil Simon, composer Cy Coleman, and director Walter Bobbie. As soon as she reached the floor, she could hear the voice of another aspiring Charity.

''I stepped back in the elevator and pressed 'down,' " Applegate recalls. ''I literally walked out into the street and said, 'What am I doing here?' The girl is such a good singer. I'm crap.

''And then that little voice that always keeps me going said, 'You have to do it. Whether you fail or succeed, it doesn't matter. You wanted to do this your whole life. So you're here. You've got your heels on. You've stretched. Go do it.' So I went back up."

That mix of pluck and vulnerability, world-weariness and wide-eyed optimism, has made Charity Hope Valentine special, even in the Federico Fellini film ''Nights of Cabiria," from which the character, a dance-hall hostess looking for love, was derived.

It's a spirit exemplified in the ''Sweet Charity" movie by MacLaine's showstopping performance of ''If My Friends Could See Me Now."

''They'd never believe it," the lyric goes--a lyric that now belongs to Applegate as the show continues its pre-Broadway run with a 10-day engagement starting Friday at the Colonial Theatre.

In hiring Applegate, producers Barry and Fran Weissler knew the 33-year-old actress could provide the pop cultural cachet to get a revival off the ground. A decade as Kelly Bundy on TV's ''Married . . . With Children" and her recent film role in ''Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy" has left her famous, with websites detailing her religious preference and bra size and even offering an ongoing, second-by-second countdown to her birthday, Nov. 25.

Her stage career, though, has been limited to guest spots with the West Hollywood burlesque act, the Pussycat Dolls, whose roster has also included Christina Aguilera and Gwen Stefani. The Dolls did ''Big Spender," a ''Sweet Charity" signature tune, but with Carmen Electra taking the lead.
Though Applegate graced the cover of Maxim as a Doll, her dancing skills went largely unnoticed.
Director Bobbie compared her with Bebe Neuwirth, who became famous on ''Cheers" but won a Tony in ''Chicago" four years after the sitcom went off the air.

''Most people thought Bebe Neuwirth was that woman in a gray suit sitting on the end of a bar with no sense of humor," he said. ''When she got out there and danced, it was a revelation. And that's what happened with Christina."

Applegate had tried out for the film of ''Chicago" but decided not to audition for the long-running stage version because, if she did Broadway, she wanted to originate a production. ''Charity" was hard to resist. A self-described Fosse fanatic, Applegate has seen the film several times. She loves Coleman's jazzy score, and Simon's script.

Tony Lipp, one of Applegate's agents at Creative Artists Agency, also encouraged her, even if the gig put her film career, thriving thanks to ''Anchorman," on hold for more than a year.

''When you look at roles that women get to play these days, there is a limited quantity of great, juicy parts," says Lipp. ''This opportunity made sense. She carries the entire show."

For Applegate, Charity is more than another role.

''She's so hopeful and trusting and loving and giving all of herself to every moment," the actress says. ''She's the most heartbreaking character I've ever played."

It's a part made famous by Gwen Verdon and MacLaine in the 1960s, and revived by Debbie Allen in 1986. But the Weisslers struggled as they cast the revival. A succession of name actresses--Jenna Elfman, Marisa Tomei, and Jane Krakowski--signed on to star before, one by one, dropping out.

''I'm glad they didn't handpick someone for this," says Applegate. ''Someone better prove that they can do it because this is a hard, hard role. I don't even know if I can do it yet."

On this day, in an almost empty room in a Times Square office building, the star is in her working duds.

That means no makeup. The skimpy, red tank-top worn for a morning press schmooze to introduce the revival has been replaced by a baggy sweatshirt. Picking at a vegetable tray, Applegate looks more like a sorority girl cramming for finals than the seductress in ''Anchorman."

''Is this OK?" Applegate asks politely before plopping on the floor. ''My back is killing me."

Putting together the Broadway revival of a show firmly set in the pre-feminist 1960s hasn't been easy, she concedes.

Behind the scenes, Simon and Bobbie have argued over the direction of the production. It reached a point where Simon decided not to come to rehearsals, instead sending his wife, Elaine Joyce, to keep watch. Composer Coleman also got involved. Before his death in November, he ran Applegate through many of the show's numbers.
''He was rough with her," says Priddy by phone from California. ''He kept making her do it over and over again, and kept making changes. She wasn't really used to being pushed that hard. She came away from that and said, 'Oh, they hate me, I don't want to do it.' "
But Applegate persevered. She brought her dog, a Chihuahua, and eight moving boxes from Los Angeles to New York, where the show was rehearsed. Her husband, actor Johnathon Schaech (''That Thing You Do!"), had to leave the country for a movie role. Alone, Applegate found herself in tears during those early run-throughs.

''I hurt my foot, I hurt my hip. I hurt my back. I hurt my neck. There were days when my body just shut down and I thought, 'This is literally an impossibility,' " she says. ''[Choreographer] Wayne [Cilento] said, 'It's not impossible, you can do it. You're going to get it and it's going to happen.' "

At least, she had danced for most of her life, stopping lessons only in the late '90s due to the time demands of her NBC sitcom ''Jesse," which ran from 1998 to 2000.

Singing presented a different challenge.

''It was pretty scary when she met the real dancers and singers she would be with," says Suzanne Kiechle, one of Applegate's voice teachers. ''She would sometimes say, 'I don't want to sing 'Sweet Charity' for a while.' So for two weeks, we sang 'I Don't Know How to Love Him' from 'Jesus Christ Superstar,' 'Cry Me a River,' and 'Out Here on My Own' from 'Fame.' She had some power. She had pitch. She just needed to develop the confidence."

That confidence will be tested during the next few weeks.

The early reviews -- from the show's opening runs in Minneapolis and Chicago -- have been mixed. The Chicago Tribune's Michael Phillips called Applegate's performance ''sweet but tentative," and New York Post theater columnist Michael Riedel went so far as to bet Barry Weissler that he'll have to replace the actress before opening night April 4 at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre.

Weissler says he's not worried.

''The show is not in trouble," he said while ''Sweet Charity" was in Minneapolis. ''I need to fix the opening, and we need to have a new ending. But she has all the tools. There's a certain vulnerability to her as a person that shows up."

Applegate says she's also not concerned about what happens after ''Charity." While her LA home is rented and her film career is on hold, she's where she wants to be: headed for Broadway, playing this part.

''I can't look at what's going to happen as a result of this because I don't own that," she says. ''I only own what I'm experiencing, so therefore every day is my success.

''Every day I get that one step down, or hit that note I didn't hit the day before, or have an emotional moment in the scene or make someone laugh, that's it."

Christina Applegate: Loopy and Grass

In "Surviving Christmas," oddball parents (James Gandolfini and Catherine O'Hara) accept a quarter of a million dollars from a rich, free-spirited marketing exec (Ben Affleck) who wants to spend Christmas in his childhood home, in which they now dwell. Christina Applegate plays their conservative daughter, although when the cast gathered to promote the movie over the weekend, she was anything but.

Forty-some interviews into her afternoon, the charming actress sat down with MTV News to ponder her passion for crass scripts, Ron Burgundy's return to the big screen and the parallels linking her "Surviving Christmas" character to Kelly Bundy. "Aren't you happy you get scheduled at the end of the day?" Applegate said. "But you know what you get to have? Loopy Christina!" And loopy she was.
MTV: Maybe it was the grumpy dad or the sex-deprived younger brother, but I just couldn't help but ...

Christina Applegate: Were you transported for a moment?

MTV: I was, I was. Did any similarities to "Married ... With Children" occur to you at all while making the movie?

Applegate: I can't remember if they did or not, but now thinking about it, I'm like, "Oh my God, that's like a parallel universe, isn't it?" Except for I'm the smart one in the family, which is nice!

MTV: What attracted you to this movie?

Applegate: The script, originally, was much more crass. It was more of a romantic sort of story, but it was very crass. I like that sort of thing, and I'm sort of drawn it — it's part of my nature. I read it, and I laughed at every page. And I liked the idea of working with Ben on a comedy because he hadn't really done that much of it. I knew that he's funny 'cause I've seen him host "SNL" and other things. I was very excited to see him get to do something different, and I knew he would be good.
MTV: When you were doing scenes with Ben, was he bringing some of his own ideas, his own dialogue?

Applegate: He wrote a lot. He wrote some scenes. I think the whole dinner-table scene he wrote. If I remember correctly, he had his little laptop there, so he's really good with that. He's really smart, and he's a really good writer, and he's very funny, so put all those together and make some magic, baby!

MTV: I like the idea that with a lot of money you can do some pretty crazy things. Is that something you see a lot in the world you live in?

Applegate: Yeah, money has gotten so out of control. People are drinking Cristal out of the bottle. Are you nuts? Do you not have any respect for Cristal? That's what I just can't handle. It's just being thrown around like it's nothing. You can't do that. You can't drink Cristal out of the bottle! Shame on you!

MTV: I'll let the rappers know.

Applegate: I actually did it once. Just to make someone laugh.

MTV: Were you inspired by any of the classic Christmas comedies?

Applegate: It's sort of the anti-Christmas comedy, though, isn't it? I mean, it has all the hecticness that seems to follow — is that a word? Hecticness? Who knows? I can make it up. If George Bush can make up words, so can I. Anyway, it's supposed to be [singing], "It's the most wonderful time," but it's really become the most stressful time of the year because it's become about consumerism and gifts, and everyone's in a rush, and we're running out of time, and it's so depressing. So I hope that we can bring some joy to the Christmas holiday with our very dysfunctional take on Christmas.

MTV: I have been hearing some rumors of an "Anchorman" sequel.

Applegate: I think what's happening is we're releasing another movie called "Wake Up, Ron Burgundy," which is another movie of everything that we shot that didn't end up in the movie. It's not bloopers or anything — it's actually an entirely different story line.

MTV: Wow, weird. Have you seen it?

Applegate: I haven't seen it yet. They've been screening it, but I've been out of town. So I look forward to seeing that, and I look forward to being with those people again. I think about them all the time. I miss them so much. I could work with [director] Adam McKay and Will Ferrell and that group every day for the rest of my life and be happy. In fact, I wouldn't even need to get paid, as long as they gave me lots of Cristal, with a straw, [to drink] out of the bottle. Just kidding.

MTV: And did I read you are doing Broadway next?

Applegate: I'm coming to New York in December to start rehearsals on "Sweet Charity." That's going to be my life for a year.

MTV: Kelly Bundy on Broadway.

Applegate: It's a lifelong dream. It's something I thought I was supposed to do in my life when I was a kid, and I pictured myself living in New York. And then "Married ... With Children" happened, and it was sort of a diversion from that dream, and I let it go. And I thought, "Well, I missed out on that. I should have done it when I was younger, when my knees worked, but it's gone now." And then this came along, and it just couldn't have been more perfect. It's one of my favorite plays. Bob Fosse, I worship. So it was perfect. It was kismet!

From sitcom to stage

Christina Applegate is making a leap - a big one. And it's not just during the dance numbers created for her by choreographer Wayne Cilento. The actress, best known for playing the bimbette daughter on TV's Married ... With Children, is starring in a revival of Sweet Charity, opening April 21 on Broadway after an extended tryout tour.

"This needed to happen for me to become a better person, a better artist," she says of facing a New York theatre audience for the first time.

"After talking to a lot of people I respect, it hit me: 'If I don't do this, I will regret it for the rest of my life.' "

The actress says this calmly, deliberately, during an afternoon lunch break, sitting in an antiseptic, anonymous corporate lounge that looks westward to the Hudson River.

YOUNG LOOK

At 33, Applegate appears 10 years younger. Her skin is flawless, her blond hair a bit tousled. She ignores a package of sushi as well as the bottled water placed before her.

Applegate has taken on the role of Charity Hope Valentine, the good-hearted taxi dancer at the centre of the Cy Coleman, Dorothy Fields, Neil Simon musical. It's a killer part, one that has to carry the whole show. No Charity, no musical.

In the past, Sweet Charity has attracted an impressive parade of women in the title role: Gwen Verdon on Broadway directed in 1966 by Bob Fosse; Juliet Prowse in London; Shirley MacLaine in the 1969 film; Debbie Allen and then Ann Reinking in the 1986 Broadway revival.

Applegate's lack of theatre experience wasn't a problem for producer Barry Weissler, the man behind the revivals of Chicago and Wonderful Town.

"She has all of the qualities we wanted for our Charity - innocence, vulnerability - and yet she's seductive," Weissler says. "She's a beautiful young woman, and we all fell in love with her."

Applegate did have to face some gruelling tests to get the job.

"She was the only woman who got through the dance audition," said Cilento, who has the unenviable task of coming up with new choreography for a show indelibly stamped by Fosse.

"Her line readings were so honest that they just made the material fresh," he said.

According to director Walter Bobbie, this 2005 Sweet Charity - the first with a post-Fosse generation of dancers - won't be a slavish revival.

"We had the blessing of Cy (who died last November) and Neil over the past year," Bobbie said, explaining that both composer and book writer were willing to re-examine the material. "To see these two men - at this point in their careers - take that on was an inspiration."

Not that Cilento, who worked with Fosse on Dancin' and Big Deal, won't pay homage to the master.

"We don't want to reinvent Sweet Charity to destroy it. We want to create new life and to bring a new point of view to the show," he said.

Applegate believes her audition for the movie version of Chicago may have sparked interest in her for the stage role of Charity.

"I grew up with the film of Sweet Charity, and I was obsessed with Fosse," Applegate recalls.

She started taking dance lessons at age five, although she stopped dancing about 10 years ago.

"I felt like I had missed the boat in not doing it professionally in New York, which is what I wanted to do as a kid. I wanted to do Broadway."

She had several meetings with Coleman, including one particularly intense three-hour get-together in Los Angeles.

"He was really challenging me. He wanted to see if vocally I had the stamina to do this. It was a very hardcore work session, but it was wonderful," she says.

HARD TO PULL UP ROOTS

Yet after Applegate was offered the job, it took her several months to commit because she has never lived outside of her Los Angeles neighbourhood, where she makes her home with her husband, actor Johnathon Schaech, who recently played Judas in the TV movie Judas Iscariot.

"This was about uprooting my life - moving away from what was comfortable," she says.

Applegate was a child of show business. Her father, Robert Applegate, is a record producer; her mother is actress-singer Nancy Priddy.

She made her first commercial before she was a year old and remembers doing radio commercials at the age of three.

"That's when I started to really enjoy this," she says, talking about her showbiz upbringing.

Married ... With Children brought her the most fame, but she also did Jesse, a short-lived sitcom.

A guest shot on Friends won her an Emmy in 2003, and she recently starred opposite Will Ferrell in Anchorman.

Applegate says she values the training that sitcoms gave her.

"People always ask, 'Do you want to get rid of it?' As if being on a sitcom was a bad thing. They are not easy to do, and it was a wonderful challenge. It's a wonderful gift to be able to do that every week. And they pay really well, too."

Plus her television shows were filmed before live audiences, a big help in her efforts to understand the relationship between performer and audience in her current role.

"You are aware of them. When you are doing comedy, you have to be. Everything is about your relationship with them. It's about pulling them in."

 

Chicago Critics Meet Broadway-Bound Sweet Charity

It's another city, another opening for Sweet Charity. Headlined by Christina Applegate and directed by Walter Bobbie, the revival began its pre-Broadway tour in Minneapolis and has now landed at Chicago's Cadillac Palace Theater, where it opened on March 3. Next up is Boston and then onto the Al Hirschfeld Theatre for an April 21 Broadway start. Did Chicago critics have fun at this staging of the classic musical?
Here is a sampling of what they had to say:

Chris Jones of Variety: "Christina Applegate's thin, reedy voice is never going to be mistaken for a brass band... But she's no celebrity charity case, either. Indeed, the former sitcom star almost busts her little naturalistic gut turning Charity Hope Valentine into a sweet, empathetic, sexy and intensely vulnerable dance-hall hostess whose tawdry life and times genuinely capture one's heart. Thanks to her strikingly honesty acting—and a delicious dexterity with the one-liner honed by years on Married... With Children—Applegate's perf far exceeds the low expectations of the usual celeb tuner turn. Assuming the right fixes are made, the rest of Walter Bobbie's stylish $7.5 million production has very solid Broadway prospects. With straightforward but pleasing choreography that lands somewhere between Fosse and Shaft, this is a young, hip, fresh, droll and under-anticipated Sweet Charity that should show greater-than-expected appeal for auds schooled on Austin Powers."

Michael Phillips of The Chicago Tribune: "With a sweet but tentative performance from Christina Applegate in the title role—an underplaying lamb surrounded by musical comedy wolves—the wan revival of Sweet Charity, continuing through next weekend at the Cadillac Palace Theatre, never makes good on the promise of its best-known song, 'Big Spender,' the one about fun, laughs and a good time. Director Walter Bobbie's production is more about bits of fun here and there, a few chuckles and, at best, an OK time... Charity's songs never required a powerhouse singer; Applegate gets by well enough there, most of the time. What's missing overall is size, and a sense of confident attack. This headliner doesn't yet have the dominating instincts to be the brass band, the cut-up, the self-fabulizing icon called for by this show."

Ben Affleck & Christina Applegate: "Surviving Christmas"

Ben Affleck was in a strange mood when he and his "Surviving Christmas" co-star Christina Applegate turned up to promote their holiday comedy "Surviving Christmas". Affleck was in a playful mood, not interested in taking this interview seriously, occasionally resting his head on Applegate's lap, while letting his arms wander. It was, to put it mildly, an odd experience.

Since these two were partnered together and trying to make complete sense of Affleck on his own would be a considerable challenge, what follows below is the rather interesting, and often comical exchange that occurred between this probing journalist and the two stars who clearly were keen for this whole experience to be behind them. As for "Surviving Christmas", it's a comedy about a guy who rents a family in order for him not to be alone at Xmas, but somehow this interview was about more than just the movie.

Question: So this your first time being paired up with Ben for interviews, Christina?

Christina Applegate: Yeah.

Question: And how's the experience then?

Christina Applegate: It's been good so far hasn't it Benny boy?

Ben Affleck: I love it myself.

Christina Applegate: You've been having a good time today?

Ben Affleck: Yeah, could you tell?

Christina Applegate: Yeah. It's been really good.

Ben Affleck: You like me a little bit better today don't you? You finally appreciate me.

Christina Applegate: In that one day? Yeah, when I didn't like you at all?

Ben Affleck: Remember when you didn't like me that time?

Christina Applegate: I did.

Question: What time was that exactly?

Ben Affleck: What did I do? I did something..

Christina Applegate: No, it wasn't that. I love you Ben it's all good.

Question: Now what would your boyfriend say about all this? [Referring to Ben laying on Christine's lap]

Ben Affleck: She is a married woman, please don't impune her integrity.

Christina Applegate: He's like my brother he's like my big brother.

Ben Affleck: Big brother, you are 43 years old.

Christina Applegate: Fuck you!

Question: So how do you survive Christmas?

Ben Affleck: I'm like a big brother. Go ahead how do you survive Christmas? Answer the question. He asked you a question.

Christina Applegate: How do you survive Christmas? You drink a lot. And drink a lot, right.

Question: Drink a lot and drink a lot.

Christina Applegate: And eat a lot. And a lot of nog.

Question: So James Gandolfini was saying that one of the problems with this movie was that the script that he originally signed on to do kept on changing and that could be very frustrating.

Ben Affleck: I feel it. The scripts yeah that is one of the problems in the nature of Hollywood movies, it is like everyone has their notes and their ideas and they keep changing it and then people want to improvise and then you know. We call it evolving (laughter) but yeah it is hard. It is also especially hard if you are somebody who likes to really memorise their lines really thoroughly as opposed to like, I like to memorise the idea of what I am going to say and then just make it up. But some writers don't appreciate that.

Christina Applegate: No, they're very precious.

Ben Affleck: They are, fuck 'em.

Christina Applegate: But we had - it didn't matter. I don't even know who wrote it originally.

Question: Did it get written - it got written by somebody though right?

Ben Affleck: There are six names on it.

Christina Applegate: And Ben wrote some of it too.

Question: You should know. I mean when you do that kind of work with someone else?

Ben Affleck: No fuck other writers. My writing is sacred. Other people's is dull. No If you had a Tom Stoppard script you would be wise not to try improvising much, you know you just like speak the words as they are written precisely. But if you have a Dog Shit script or even something that is decent but requires some fixing then you just do that, you know you improvise a little bit and if you are as lucky enough to work with. It is the same reason why most beautiful women aren't funny cause they don't have to be. I can go to the grocery store, and the most beautiful women don't have to be funny they can just be beautiful and people pay attention to them, which is why we are a blast and gifted here with Christina. When you have somebody like that you can choose some improvising, [to Christina] I am trying to help you cause you looked funny. But Christina and I rift on some scenes.

Christina Applegate: Yeah, we had a good time with that. And Benny's a funny guy; you're a funny dude.

Ben Affleck: Very kind of you to say.

Question: While we are expanding on the theory does this mean that you are looking at a girl or man. Would it be one of the most important qualities you admire?

Ben Affleck: If it is a comedy!

Question: No, no I mean personally in life.

Christina Applegate: In life? I think anyone.

Ben Affleck: I mean Sean Penn not that funny but great actor.

Question: You've heard of the Team America thing right?

Christina Applegate: He was in Sad Fast Times at Ridgemont High and he was really funny.

Question: You haven't seen Team America yet?

Ben Affleck: There is that whole song about how bad..

Question: There is a whole song about you in that movie.

Ben Affleck: Yeah I ran into those guys at a party and they were like, 'you don't mind if we make fun of you?' and I said, 'no I don't really care' but you know I would sort of be more insulted if it were coming from the masters that brought us Baseketball, you know what I mean, it's like there are good guys and there are funny guys but they were like...

Christina Applegate: Don't rag on Baseketball now.

Ben Affleck: You can't be in your own movies it has to be puppets. So you know it is funny as a song it is funny!

Question: You do seem to be able to poke fun at yourself, Ben?

Ben Affleck: Yes, I have a good sense of humour about that kind of thing because if you don't you will hang yourself.

Christina Applegate: I think it's important for you to be able to focus on yourself Ben?

Ben Affleck: Thank you.

Christina Applegate: That's not a general thing for people, just for you Ben.

Ben Affleck: Although is that whole movie funny? [Team America]

Question: I thought it was very funny, and the puppet sex scene is one of the funniest you've ever seen.

Ben Affleck: Puppet sex that is funny right there.

Question: What's the weirdest Christmas you've had?

Christina Applegate: The weirdest Christmas? I don't know. Christmas is a weird period don't you think. It's a bizarre holiday. I don't know. I haven't had any weird Christmases. Ben?

Ben Affleck: Seems like you don't want to answer any questions, you're making me answer them. Ahh I don't have any weird Christmases although I mean the most unusual Christmas I had was probably last year, which I spent in the Middle East, that was definitely and unusual Christmas being there with all the soldiers and you know in the Middle East it was strange. I mean and shocking that you know how grand a form of service that really is to be in war time in the military and what different cultures, what that culture was like and how hard that kind of life is to be working 12 hour shifts on Christmas afraid you might get blown up I mean that's at like fifty cents an hour I mean that is kind of no joke.

Christina Applegate: When did you find out when there was no Santa Claus? Do you remember what year that was?That was last year wasn't it Mr Affleck?

Ben Affleck: There is no Santa Claus? (laughter). You set me up. When did I find out.. I did at one time believe in Santa because I do remember asking my mother, like how did Santa know. That's what really freaked me out, was like how he would know. How did he know that that's just what I wanted? I think it disturbed me more than anything else. It gave me like a weird 1984 feeling, like Big Brother was watching me and I wasn't happy with that because I was humping into the bed posts and I hoped Santa didn't know that.

Question: What was that?

Christina Applegate: He was humping the bedpost and he was hoping that Santa didn't know that. That's the worst thing when you find out that there's no Santa Claus.

Ben Affleck: Not when you hump the bedpost.

Question: When was the last time you humped the bedpost?

Christina Applegate: That too, it's kind of rough.

Ben Affleck: No, no I moved to the bed.

Question: How did you find out there was no Santa Claus?

Christina Applegate: I was six years old and...

Question: Humping the bed post?

Christina Applegate: Humping the bed post and I went out because I was so excited because the cake had been eaten and the presents were laid out and then I looked on the shelf and there was the same wrapping paper on the shelf that there was on the presents from Santa Claus and I put two and two together and I was pissed.

Question: Did you confront them?

Christina Applegate: I was pissed for the lying, for all the lying all those years.

Question: Really?

Christina Applegate: Uh-huh. I was so mad. I was like six years old and I think I was like cursing my mother out like how could you do this and lie to me all these years. It was awful.

Ben Affleck: It was the lies. It's not the gaff, it's the cover up, you know what I mean?

Christina Applegate: I know they went through all that effort.

Question: So you think parents shouldn't actually make their kids believe in Santa Claus?

Christina Applegate: No I think it's a beautiful thing to believe in Santa Claus. Those were the best Christmases ever, were the ones that you believed in Santa Claus.

Ben Affleck: My early days, I actually did a lot of work as the Easter Bunny so I believe in him.

Question: What was this?

Christina Applegate: You believe in the Easter Bunny?

Ben Affleck: I was the actual Easter Bunny. I had to go around and giving kids fuckin' chocolate because I was broke. Then I did some tooth fairy work.

Christina Applegate: You did?

Ben Affleck: Yeah.

Christina Applegate: I didn't know that about you.

Question: Do you ever look back on those days and think things.

Ben Affleck: With humiliation and rage?

Question: Yeah.

Ben Affleck: Yes. No, I romanticised the times that I was broke and desperate because I think in retrospect it was fun, you know what I mean? I was - I don't know, I just think I had - there were a lot more possibilities and I had a lot less to lose or something, I don't know. The future was wide open and I didn't have as many worries and that was kind of fun. But at the time I did actually have a lot of worries, like paying the rent and that wasn't fun.

Question: What worries you now then? What do you stress over now?

Ben Affleck: Different stuff, you know.

Question: The paparazzi?

Ben Affleck: That doesn't worry me so much, that's just what it is you know. What worries me is...

Christina Applegate: Are you worried about premature balding?

Ben Affleck: I am. I worry about premature balding.

Christina Applegate: You've got nothing to worry about. Come on, you're not, you're good. No, you're good.

Ben Affleck: I'm good? Thank God.

Christina Applegate: Yeah.

Question: You've got a great head of hair.

Ben Affleck: I worry about - I don't know, I worry about the same normal things that everybody worries about, being what kind of person and that, trying to be a good person and trying not to die and that sort of stuff.

Question: Are you and Damon going to get together and write again, or is this the end of that?

Ben Affleck: I would like to, we would like to but we both just keep working in movies.

Question: So you're writing project is postponed indefinitely?

Ben Affleck: No, I just adapted a book that I just turned into Paramount by Dennis Lahane, called Gone Baby Gone. I just finished that. I actually have to do another step on it, so it's not really finished, but I did the second draft so I'm doing that. I'll definitely write something else with Matt.

Question: What about the acting?

Ben Affleck: I'm doing this movie called Man About Town right now in Vancouver, which is kind of a comedy and it's a lot of fun. With Rebecca Romjin and Gina Gershon.

Christina Applegate: My God, that's right, she's not Stamos any more.

Question: That's right, she's unStamed.

Ben Affleck: Yes, she has been de-Stamosed.

Question: And you also did a cameo in Elektra - that was a favour to your girl?

Ben Affleck: I did a cameo. Yes.

Question: Does it entice you to want to back and relive that character?

Ben Affleck: No.

Question: Why?

Ben Affleck: I don't want to do any action movies, I'm tired of it. They're boring and they're exhausting and they suck.

Christina Applegate: He just wants to do movies with me.

Ben Affleck: I want to do Christina Applegate or Christina Aguilera - one of the two Christina's. I want to do comedies, do you know what I mean?

Question: That's your favourite genre?

Christina Applegate: You should, you're so good at it.

Ben Affleck: It's my favourite genre.

Christina Applegate: Did you see him on SNL a couple of weeks ago, he's very funny.

Question: So if you don't want to do any more action movies, what kinds of films are you looking for?

Ben Affleck: I would like to do comedies or else do tough roles, like - I'd rather do roles smaller and more interesting roles like the stuff I did in Boiler Room or Dogma or Good Will Hunting.

Question: Is Kevin - are you in touch with Kevin Smith?

Ben Affleck: Yeah, I saw Kevin last night at the premier.

Question: He was upset you didn't come to the launch of the DVD for Jersey Girl.

Ben Affleck: It wasn't enough that I went to Vegas to play in his lame charity poker tournament for the DVD launch of Jersey Girl, but I also had to go out to his fucking store where he's opening a store where all he's doing is selling more T-shirts of him and his jackass friend and he's roped in an entire generation of kids into thinking it's worth spending $30 on and $50 if he signs it. I mean the whole thing is a complete travesty and he wanted me to participate in it and I won't do that.

Christina Applegate: That's friendship though.

Ben Affleck: That's love. It is love, I could feel the love in the room actually.

Question: You were in Celebrity Poker. Was that fun?

Ben Affleck: I played the best, but I lost anyway. It's going to happen in poker sometimes. I got, what you called, sucked out on which, by the way it sounds you might think is a good thing, but it isn't, it's a bad thing. My jokes are just dying.

Question: I thought it was funny.

Christina Applegate: Wooden.

Ben Affleck: What is it about me that makes you want to go to sleep, seriously.

Christina Applegate: No I'm right here, I love you, I'm here.

Question: Tell me how do you keep your relationship out the tabloids as opposed to...

Ben Affleck: Me and Christina, we travel around and we talk about the movie. And we tell them Surviving Christmas. When's it coming out?

Christina Applegate: October something.

Ben Affleck: Is there a number?

Christina Applegate: October 22nd.

Ben Affleck: 22.

Christina Applegate: A week from today.

Ben Affleck: A week. We've got a fuckin' (laughter)

Question: So you just don't talk about it any more?

Ben Affleck: I'm not going to talk about my personal life.

Christina Applegate: How do you keep it up, that's what he asked you.

Ben Affleck: How do I keep it up.

Question: Christina, when is your play opening?

Christina Applegate: It's opening in April of next year.

Ben Affleck: What's it about?

Christina Applegate: Sweet Charity.

Ben Affleck: I don't know what it's about, I don't know musical theatre.

Christina Applegate: It's a Bob Fosse play, musical.

Question: Shirley Maclaine did the original movie.

Ben Affleck: Oh really.

Christina Applegate: Shirley MacLaine did it originally in the movie.

Ben Affleck: What's it about? What's the story?

Christina Applegate: It's about a dance hall hostess and we're trying to find love.

Ben Affleck: Do you find love? Who's the man you fall in love with?

Christina Applegate: She finds love within her own self. That's the moral.

Ben Affleck: But who's the man she lies down in the bed with?

Christina Applegate: His name's Oscar and he's great.

Ben Affleck: Who's playing him.

Christina Applegate: But he can't get over the fact that she's got this other life.

Ben Affleck: Never mind that, who's playing him?

Christina Applegate: His name is Denis O'Hare.

Ben Affleck: Is he sexy?

Christina Applegate: He's an awesome actor.

Ben Affleck: Are you attracted to him? I just want to know if there's going to be chemistry?

Christina Applegate: Are we dating? Yes.

Question: You're dating too, wow. And how does your husband feel about that?

Christina Applegate: My husband's totally fine with it.

Ben Affleck: He loves it. Because he's off the hook.

Question: Are you working on anything at the moment Ben, or not?

Ben Affleck: Yes, I'm doing a move called Man About Town.

Question: With whom?

Ben Affleck: Mike Binder who made one of the best movies I've seen in years.

Question: What was that?

Ben Affleck: You have got to see this thing. It's called The Upside of Anger. Kevin Costner and Joan Allen are in it.

Question: Really?

Ben Affleck: Kevin Costner is fucking amazing in this movie. It will blow your mind. It's the comeback costume movie of all time.

Question: What does he play?

Ben Affleck: He's fat, he's like an alcoholic. He goes really bald. He's fucking like a total disaster guy and what's-her-name is like a drunk too and it doesn't sound great but it's really funny and it's really good. It's one of the best movies I've seen in a long time. As soon as you get the opportunity I recommend you guys check it out, The Upside of Anger.

Question: And who do you play in the film that you're shooting?

Ben Affleck: Who I play, is I play a literary agent who - I play a guy who finds out that his wife had an affair with his client and tries to forgive her and see if he can forgive her or not. Would you forgive you wife if she fooled around? See. Most men say no and that's what it's an interesting story that you haven't seen before. It's like most women deal with it and most men just think couldn't do it.

More fun stuff about Christina Applegate

Quit school at 17.

Chosen as one of People Magazine's, "50 Most Beautiful People, 1999"

Co-wrote "The Penis Song" with The Sweetest Thing (2002) co-stars Cameron Diaz and Selma Blair, but the trio's performance of the song was edited out of the final cut.

First appeared on television as an infant in a commercial for disposable diapers.

Measurements: 35-23-35 1/2 (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine)

Friend of Nicole Eggert.

While filming View from the Top (2003), she met Gwyneth Paltrow. They are now good friends.

Referred to in the 1991 song "Set Adrift on Memory Bliss" by PM Dawn.

Went to high school with Milla Jovovich.

Met her husband Jonathon thru director Gregg Arak

Finds Al Green's song Simply Beautiful one of the sexiest songs she's ever heard.

 

Christina Applegate: "Fur: Get Me Not!"

PETA: Have you always been against fur or was there a time when you didn’t know any better?

Christina: When I was 6 years old, I had a little fur coat, but that was it. That’s the only time I’ve ever had any in my life.

PETA: How did you become aware of the animal suffering involved in the fur trade?

Christina: When I became a vegetarian, I just started reading more and more about where fur comes from and what they do to the animals. It all went hand-in-hand together. That was when I was 15.

PETA: What prompted you to go vegetarian? Was there one incident?

Christina: I was eating lunch on the Married With Children set, and they served me some kind of meat (I don’t even know the names of them all anymore because it’s been so long). I looked down and there was blood on my plate, and it was that realization, that I can’t eat something that has been alive, I just can’t do it. So I stopped, and that was it. That was the last time.

PETA: Have you always had animals in your life?

Christina: Always, ever since I was a little girl, my house has been basically a zoo. Everything I have has dog hair on it, and that’s just the way it is.

PETA: PETA does a lot of provocative things in order to keep people focused on important issues. How do you feel about that and about some of PETA’s outrageous tactics?

Christina: I think it’s great that you guys do that. I think that it’s important—sometimes you do have to shout out to be heard.

PETA: We hope your ad will encourage people not to buy fur as gifts during the holidays, which we think should be a time for compassion and empathy toward others. Is there anything you’d like to say to people, with that in mind?

Christina: They make really great synthetic fur—you really don’t need real fur. And it’s cheaper, so why spend the money? The holidays are also a time when people freak out about their finances. If you don’t want to spend the money, why not try some of the other options instead of killing a bunch of animals?

Christina Applegate's Singing Cat

Sexy actress CHRISTINA APPLEGATE's pet cat has a special talent - it sings.

The former MARRIED...WITH CHILDREN star, who has two cats and a dog, recently discovered her pet's vocal abilities, and now she's started to record it.

She says, "My cat sings with me - and I have tapes of it. I discovered this talent in my cat one day when I was doing vocal scales in my house.

"Every time I would go to the bottom of the scale, he would sing. And then I'd go up again and I'd stop and he'd go, 'Meow.' And on and on and on. On key, on time, every time."

But Applegate admits her other cat boasts no such talent, joking, "She's more of a dancer!"

 

Christina's personal quotes:

"This was a major commitment. I really had to sit and think about it. I eventually came to the conclusion that it came into my life for a reason." - on accepting her role in the sitcom "Jesse."

"There are a lot of sacrifices a mother makes when she's raising a child by herself. I saw it when I was growing up, watching all my mother did for me. But it wasn't until recently that I fully understood the price she paid because of how we had to struggle."

"The person who I have my child with is going to be the right person. I don't want to raise a child by myself. I could do it. But I definitely don't want to. I want to be a mother who has the original father there. And I want to be with that person until I'm 80 years old, sitting out on the porch with our glasses of lemonade, laughing about our lives."

"The show definitely shocked and disgusted people. But, privately, they enjoyed laughing at it. I think all too often people look at the perfect families on television and think 'Why can't my family be like that?' In the case of "Married With Children", people were able to say, 'Thank God my family's not like that!'" - on her sitcom "Married With Children", which ran from 1987 to 1997.

"I've always been shy and sort of vulnerable. My mom says that when she would drop me off at school, I'd stand back and check out the situation - see if it was safe before I'd join the other kids."

"I wasn't one to go out and buy a new car and stereo system and expensive clothes. My mom helped keep me grounded." - on becoming a TV star in her teens

"We're best friends. And that spark is always there. I can't wait to see him, even though I saw him a few hours ago." - about her husband actor Johnathon Schaech

"I started doing radio commercials for Kmart when I was 4. They had to splice all my consonants together because I couldn't talk very well. But these jobs helped my mother and me put food on the table. It took the two of us working."

"It was not easy for my mother, being a struggling actress and raising a child. We were these two sort of vagabonds, never knowing where the money was going to come from. She always says she couldn't afford a babysitter, which is why she put me on the stage."

"It's one of those choices that I can honestly say was a big mistake. I wish I had a better knowledge of history and the other things I could've learned. Of course, nothing is stopping me from learning now. In fact, I'm probably better prepared." - on having quit school

"Every single kid in my group of friends at school was from a single-parent family."

 

Christina Applegate Still in Blake Jury

Hollywood star Christina Applegate is having difficulties excusing herself from the jury in the forthcoming Robert Blake murder trial. The Sweetest Thing actress has been trying to get out of her civic duty by claiming professional obligations prevent her from serving on a four to five month trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Darlene Schempp is yet to oblige Christina's request, even though Spinal Tap star Harry Shearer has already been excused on the same grounds. Her manager Tami Lynn is hopeful, saying, "We expect to know later in the week." Baretta actor Blake has been accused of murdering his wife Bonnie Lee Bakley in Studio City, California in May 2001.

Christina Applegate Gets Her Hands Dirty

Cameron Diaz, Selma Blair and Christina Applegate teamed up to transform a barren schoolyard into a butterfly park for fashion magazine Marie Claire. The trio, co-stars in new road movie The Sweetest Thing, took on the challenge of sprucing up Los Angeles' Kester Elementary School after hearing how kids were desperate to turn their wasteland into something really worthwhile. And the actresses split the kids up into three teams - Team Selma, Team Cameron and Team Christina - to get the job done. Their efforts make up part of a eight-page spread in the new Marie Claire. Diaz, who last appeared in the magazine when she spent three days in the desert with her Charlie's Angels co-stars Drew Barrymore and Lucy Liu, says, "I love being in Marie Claire because you get to do something, rather than sit down and talk about the same things over and over again. I come from a long line of sturdy, hearty women who've been bent over in the garden. It's all in the technique."

Christina Applegate Plans To Be Married With Children

Actress Christina Applegate is already planning on adding children to her new family, just a week after getting married. The blonde star married her 32-year-old husband Johnathon Schaech in Palm Springs, California at the weekend. And according to friends, the Married With Children actress is already planning to live up to her the title of her famous sitcom. A pal says, "Christina told me, 'This is like a fairy tale, a dream come true. The only thing that will make it even better is when Jonathan and I start having kids together. We're going to start working on that next'."

Martin To Join Christina In TV Fairy Tale

Actor Martin Short will be joined by Christina Applegate, two-time tony winner Bernadette Peters, Billy Connolly, Andrea Martin and British actor Sean Maguire in TNT's Prince Charming scripted by Doug Palau and directed by Allan Arkush. After an accidental extramarital flirt, fairy-tale kingdom inhabitants Prince John (Maguire) and his sidekick Rodney (Short) are turned into frogs for all eternity or until the prince can convince a maiden to kiss him and then marry him. The frogs are accidentally transported to New York's Central Park where the prince falls in love with streetwise Kate (Applegate) but unfortunately kisses another woman (Peters), whom he should persuade to marry him to break the curse.


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